A PHP Error was encountered

Severity: Notice

Message: Undefined variable: top_slider_image_num

Filename: views/top_slider_view.php

Line Number: 4

A PHP Error was encountered

Severity: Notice

Message: Undefined variable: top_slider_image_num

Filename: views/top_slider_view.php

Line Number: 4

A PHP Error was encountered

Severity: Notice

Message: Undefined variable: top_slider_image_num

Filename: views/top_slider_view.php

Line Number: 4

A PHP Error was encountered

Severity: Notice

Message: Undefined variable: top_slider_image_num

Filename: views/top_slider_view.php

Line Number: 4

A PHP Error was encountered

Severity: Notice

Message: Undefined variable: top_slider_image_num

Filename: views/top_slider_view.php

Line Number: 4

A PHP Error was encountered

Severity: Notice

Message: Undefined variable: top_slider_image_num

Filename: views/top_slider_view.php

Line Number: 4

A PHP Error was encountered

Severity: Notice

Message: Undefined variable: top_slider_image_num

Filename: views/top_slider_view.php

Line Number: 4

A PHP Error was encountered

Severity: Notice

Message: Undefined variable: top_slider_image_num

Filename: views/top_slider_view.php

Line Number: 4

A PHP Error was encountered

Severity: Notice

Message: Undefined variable: top_slider_image_num

Filename: views/top_slider_view.php

Line Number: 4

A PHP Error was encountered

Severity: Notice

Message: Undefined variable: top_slider_image_num

Filename: views/top_slider_view.php

Line Number: 4

Impressions of the play Simple Dreams at the training seminar of the Noam Zionist youth movement and at the Conservative Movement’s Adraba Center for Children with Disabilities    

 Ronen Ben-Avraham, director of the Adraba Center of the Conservative Movement (known in Israel as the Masorti Movement), says:
“The Neta’im program for the integration of children and youth with disabilities into the [Conservative Movement’s] Noam Zionist youth movement, is about Children and teenagers with IDD are integrated into several branches of Noam, such as Hod Hasharon, Kfar Sava-Raanana, Nahariya-Shorashim, Be’er Sheva-Omer, Haifa and Carmiel.
Some 300 people — counselors, branch coordinators and volunteers in Noam’s pre-military year of volunteer service — attended the Masorti Movement’s Hanukkah seminar for participants in Noam’s counselor training program. The third day of the seminar was devoted to learning about the integration of children and youth with IDD into mainstream environments.
A special activity was held on that day to increase awareness of the world of people with IDD. It focused on such questions as “What is normal?” “How do we define the term ‘disability’?” and “Are people with IDD left out of mainstream environments?”
Later that day, all of the seminar’s participants saw the play Simple Dreams, which was performed by the AKIM Valley Theater Group and directed by Ido Weiss. The members of the audience laughed, cried, experienced excitement and joy and rejoiced together with the actors.
After the performance, the cast stayed for a discussion, prayer services, the lighting of Hanukkah candles and supper with the leadership trainees who were attending the seminar.
The counselors will remember the meaning, message and insights of this play for the rest of this year’s educational activities and, we hope, for the rest of their lives.
“Let me conclude here with a passage" said Ronen Ben-Avraham, " from ‘A prayer to be recited after prayer’ by Rabbi Elimelech of Lizhansk: ‘All the more so, let our hearts see in others their positive qualities, not their deficiencies.’”

The Shalem Foundation assisted in funding the production of the play "Simple dream".

 

 



Shalem Foundation courses in academia    

 People with IDD are entitled to lead full, rich lives in their communities and enjoy everything that the world around them offers, including culture, architecture, health services, and social services.
The academic world is one of the most important places where professionals, therapists, government officials and policy-makers of the future are trained in a wide variety of subjects.
In accordance with this outlook, the Foundation has funded several university courses in recent years. This is in addition to the Shalem Foundation’s investment in basic and refresher courses for caregivers who work with people with IDD.
In these courses, students in a variety of disciplines learn about people with IDD (and their families) in the various departments of Israel’s universities and academic colleges.
The Shalem Foundation has notified the country’s institutions of higher learning that it is prepared to fund courses on the topic of people with IDD. During the 2015–2016 academic year, the Foundation funded nine such courses.
 
A survey of three of them follows.

 
“Body, space and everything in between”: People with IDD
Architecture and Town Planning Faculty, The Technion Institute of Technology

Architects face many challenges when they plan a structure. These challenges have to do with various topics and disciplines, including the social sciences, the humanities, economics, management, culture and education.
Architecture students at the Technion must also deal with complex challenges in their studies. As they progress, they learn about town planning and the planning of structures such as public buildings, cultural institutions, residential buildings and school buildings.
The planning and architecture world deals with the health services field, among many others. Planning of the physical environment has a significant effect on human functioning. Studies have shown that the quality of hospitalization and treatment spaces has a major influence on the nature of the treatment and the length of the recovery period. A health-promoting environment can lower tension and anxiety levels in human beings, making their stay in hospitals, hospices, day-treatment centers and other health-care institutions easier to bear.
Everyday activities that are so easy and effortless for most of the population, are a complex daily challenge for people with IDD because people with IDD have difficulty acquiring learning and communication skills. They may also suffer from a low level of motor and cognitive functioning.
The Technion offers a theory course that focuses on the planning of health-promoting environments. This course supplements the studio course.
This course discusses the healing environment in the holistic sense, as well as in terms of the environment and the community. The aim of the course is to provide students with planning tools and to focus on issues connected with the creation of places and spaces while paying attention to the unique needs of people with IDD.
Twenty eight students took the course. Of them, 12 participated in the practical studio course and submitted projects.
The theoretical course provided students with an introduction to the world of health-promoting environments, as well as solid facts about people with IDD. The theoretical course helped the students cope with the complex challenges of environmental planning for this population. In the studio course, the students obtained hands-on experience with an entire process focused on the architectural planning of a building that provided services to people with IDD. The students used what they had learned in the theoretical course to develop their projects.
The planning course, taken in conjunction with theoretical course, offers a promising platform for the advancement of the aims of the Shalem Foundation, which devotes its efforts to improving the quality of life of people with IDD and promotes awareness among the Israeli public of this population’s needs. The course also helped showcase the topic of intellectual disability for the students — the architects of the future.
The core of the semester exercise, which the third- and fourth-year architecture students had to perform, was the planning of a day-treatment center for people with IDD.
During the planning process, the students discussed various issues related to space and the creation of a space.
Special emphasis was placed on the way that people in general, and people with IDD in particular, experience architectural space, with special focus on the relationship between human beings and their environment and on sensual perception.
The students discussed architectural involvement that interprets space and programs. They also focused on the relationship between structures and the contexts where they are located and the relationship between structures and the community. The students attempted to create a high-quality environment that met the target population’s special needs.
The projects the students submitted for the practical studio course put the theoretical and practical content that they had learned in both courses to good use. The students said that the theoretical course was necessary for all students of architecture, with or without reference to the population of people with IDD, because it provided the background and tools that enable architects to see the client for whom they are planning and to turn theoretical clients into actual ones.
The course was conceived and coordinated by architect Alon Zohar, with the professional support of Professor Dafna Fisher Gewirtzman of the Faculty of Architecture and of Professor Alona Nitzan-Shiftan, head of the architectural track at the Technion, who noted that the projects submitted in the studio course were on a particularly high level.
The aim is that the theoretical knowledge and the students’ projects could serve as a significant component in developing innovative thought regarding the planning design of a living environment for people with IDD.
Pictured: Professor Alona Nitzan-Shiftan evaluates the students’ projects, and architectural student Avishai Sussman presents his project.
 

Intervention methods for people with intellectual disabilities and their families
The Paul Baerwald School of Social Work and Social Welfare, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
 

In recent years, work with people with IDD (intellectual developmental disorder) has become a major field in social work. Social workers are professionally committed to contributing to the quality of life and well-being of people with disabilities and their families. They follow the current value-oriented position that acknowledges the powers of the individual and focuses on the discourse of the rights of people with IDD. The aim of the course is to teach the students intervention methods for people with IDD and their families as they become familiar with the way the family life cycle changes from the moment a child with disabilities is born until he or she becomes an adult with IDD.
The course — an introduction to the topic of people with IDD and their families — included lectures and learning about various contexts for people with IDD. The lecturers were given by guest lecturers and professionals who work with people with IDD and their families. The planned study tours did not take place because of the security situation.
Ms. Goldie Marans, the academic coordinator and a main lecturer in the course, said, “Twenty-one students who had chosen to study this field took the course. They were involved; they spoke, argued and joined me on a fascinating journey into the world of intellectual disability (ID). They wanted to know why this was still happening, and wanted to understand the differences between ID and autism. They discussed the right to terminate pregnancy, as well as the siblings of the people with IDD …, and so on.
“The students were required to perform two tasks: an intermediate group task and an individual final project. The results were of high quality. This was a fascinating journey during which we taught and learned about the world of IDD once more, through the students’ eyes. The world in 2016 is different, as are the options that medicine provides regarding health services, well-being and intervention methods that are not the methods of the past.
“The Paul Baerwald School of Social Work and Social Welfare will continue to teach this subject in the belief that the students, the social workers of the future, will need these tools in order to perform their professional duties in the best possible manner.”
The development and existence of this course were made possible thanks to the academic and administrative support of Dr. Yehudith Avnir and Dr. Shirley Warner of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem’s School of Social Work and Social Welfare.


Issues in the study of disabilities and their implications for genetic counseling
The Department for Genetic Counseling, School of Medicine, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
 

The immense technological developments that have taken place in recent years in genetics present genetic counselors not only with professional challenges involved in learning and understanding genetic tools but also with ethical challenges of responsibility for and insight into the disabilities of the patient and his family.
Since genetic testing and diagnosis of IDD have become more detailed and precise over the years, it is possible to diagnose an increasing number of families with IDD and pregnancies that do not carry an early risk of IDD. Despite the advantages of this diagnosis, it presents the ones diagnosed, together with their families and the medical team, with many challenges.
The purpose of the course is to develop students’ theoretical and practical knowledge in the field of genetic counseling for people with disabilities (particularly IDD) and their families. The course focuses extensively on issues connected with genetic testing before and during pregnancy, the diagnosis of IDD and the dilemmas that might arise following such testing.
The main topics are:
• Facts and figures on people with ID in Israel
• Familiarization with up to date genetic diagnostic tools for an IDD
• Principal theories in the study of disabilities, and individual meetings with people with disabilities and their parents
• Social welfare legislation and Israeli policies regarding people with disabilities
• Professional dilemmas regarding genetic counseling for people with ID before and during pregnancy
• Tools for conveying bad news to parents or pregnant women on the discovery of a genetic factor that may result in ID
• Counseling tools in cases where the diagnosis of the pregnancy or the family is uncertain
• Public and professional attitudes in Israel toward people with ID
Dr. Shiri Shekedy Rapid, the course coordinator, says:
“Students who come from the clinical world had a hard time dealing with a course like this, its variety of lecturers and its teaching methods. Still, they found the parts of the course that had to do with meeting the families, conveying bad news and attitudes important and interesting. The main insight is that a course of this kind must be conducted as a workshop with role-playing and work in small groups.”
Twelve students in the Master’s program in the track for genetic counseling in medicine, nursing and public health took the course.
The development of the course and its existence were made possible thanks to the academic and administrative support of Professor Vardiella Meiner, director of the Center for Clinical Genetics at the Department of Genetics and Metabolic Diseases in the School of Medicine, Hadassah University Medical Center, Ein Kerem, and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
 

The Shalem Foundation is a partner in the development and funding of these courses.
 
Pictures from the coures "Body, space and everyting berween", The Technion


 



Eti's World: Music lover and future police officer   Just like everyone else: interviews with our most precious partners  

 Meet charming ten year old Eti from Holon; she loves to play with puzzles and to hear music. Her favorite food is pasta and she wants to become a police officer when she grows up.

   



אם תרצו אין זו אגדה... בית קטן בערבה    

 -

אתמול נחנך בית ל 8 דיירים עם מוגבלויות שכליות, חושיות ופיזיות בקיבוץ קטורה , אחד מיישובי מועצת חבל איילות. חבל איילות המאופיין בריחוק גיאוגרפי ממרכז הארץ , משתרע על שטח גיאוגרפי גדול יחסית,  מיושב ב-65,000 תושבים לערך בלבד וכולל בהתאמה , מספר קטן יחסית של אנשים עם צרכים מיוחדים וכתוצאה מהיעדר מסה קריטית לא פותחו מסגרות ביישובי החבל.     

 ג'נט וליסה שתי אימהות מסורות ונחושות  תושבות קטורה, החלו בהגיית הרעיון בשנת 2005. במשך שנים הן דאגו לסחוף אנשים סביבן , לטפח ולקדם  את החזון שלהן : הקמת בית לילדיהם בקרבת המשפחה. אתמול זכינו ברוב התרגשות וברוב עם לראות את חלומן מתגשם.

במשרד הרווחה שילבו ידיים ומימשו בבית זה את חזון מינהל המוגבלויות.  

קרן שלם גאה בשותפות עם הגורמים השונים : קיבוץ קטורה,  הרשויות ואגפי הרווחה במועצת חבל איילות ובעיר אילת , משרד הרווחה, אגודת עמי,  הקרן לפיתוח שירותים לנכים בביטוח הלאומי.   

 

קרן שלם מברכת בשנה טובה את תושבי וצוות הבית, את ההורים המסורים שלא ויתרו על הגשמת חלומם ולשותפים הרבים והנאמנים.  

 

 

 



Professional Study Tour for Social Services Coordinators    

 -

Twenty social workers who serve as directors and coordinators of services for individuals with intellectual and development disabilities (IDD) went to the United Kingdom for a study tour in June. The social workers, who are employed at the social welfare and social services departments of local and regional authorities, went on the tour with representatives of the Shalem Foundation, the Ministry of Social Affairs and Social Services and the Federation of Local Authorities. This is the second time that the Shalem Foundation has sent a study mission overseas. The previous study tour in 2013 took the participants to Stockholm.

The tradition of the Shalem Foundation’s overseas study tours began five years ago, upon the success of the Traveling Study Day tour that the Foundation has been running in Israel for more than a decade. The goal of the overseas study tour is to enable professionals working in the field to learn about the services provided elsewhere in the world for individuals with IDD and to gain inspiration from their interactions with others in the field.

Riva Muskal, Executive Director of the Shalem Foundation, who headed the mission, says: “We organized the first study tour to Stockholm three years ago. The participants still talk about that tour even today, and about how the meetings and trips gave them the inspiration that spurred them to act and institute innovations in their work here in Israel.

“At the Shalem Foundation, we believe that knowledge equals power. This is why we constantly aspire to learn about a wide range of success stories and models that have proven themselves. We do this in order to start new projects in the field among those who are involved in the Shalem Foundation’s work here in Israel.”

So what is actually happening in the UK?
In the UK, social services for children and education for children are the responsibility of the Department for Education (DfE). All social service departments, the school system and the health services network are required to cooperate with one another.
Social and education services are provided by the local authorities, which are defined by geographical region. Children and adolescents receive services via the specially designated departments that operate in the local authorities. These services can be provided by private-sector organizations, voluntary associations or non-profit organizations.
Services for adults are provided primarily in accordance with of two principal laws.
The first is the Care/Treatment Act of 2014, which is considered the most significant reform legislation made in the U.K for over 60 years, primarily because caregivers and patients have been provided with the opportunity to control and make decisions about their care and treatment and support. The act’s principles, which are the basis for care and support, place greater emphasis on prevention and on encouraging people to adopt a positive and healthy lifestyle that can reduce, prevent or delay the need for care.
The second is the Mental Capacity Act of 2015, which provides a framework for the empowerment and protection of individuals who are incapable of making decisions for themselves. The act defines who is authorized to make decisions for such individuals and under what circumstances, and the requirements that they must meet.

Beginning the journey
The study tour, which was organized in cooperation with Lumos (a charitable organization established by J.K. Rowling, creator of the Harry Potter series), began with a background meeting with professionals in the field of disabilities.
The study tour included, inter alia, a visit to and meetings with the representatives of the following organizations:
1. LUMOS, a charitable organization that provides services and programs to various population groups consisting of people with special needs
2. CHANGE, an organization that employs individuals with learning difficulties and pays them a regular salary
3. Rothwell Day Centre, a daycare center and non-profit social project, which provides supportive and care services and a treatment framework for individuals with various disabilities
4. Paperworks, a business-oriented social project that offers services of a social value and uses revenues from commerce in order to provide financial support
5. The National Health Service (NHS) and the Department of Health, which are responsible for national healthcare
6. The Shared Lives Plus housing scheme, a social project promoting communal living
7. Foodworks, a coffee shop that is part of the Supportworks organization and that supplies a wide range of activities and opportunities in housing, occupational training, employment and integration within the community
8. Lough Road, a center that provides short-term family support for children and young people with severe and complex disabilities
9. Springboard Opportunity Group, whose programs provide support for children with special needs and with disabilities from birth to age 5 and for their parents
10. St. Quintin’s Children Centre, a center that supports handicapped children and youth and their families
11. Norwood Services – Kennedy Leigh Family Centre, a Jewish charity founded over two centuries ago
We were particularly impressed by our individual meetings with the Messengers, individuals with intellectual and other disabilities who work with the Department of Health as advisers and instructors and receive a regular salary. The Messengers help make employers more aware of people with IDD and help IDD individuals to integrate into the open job market.

Voices from the field
Giving social workers who operate in the field the chance to be part of such a delegation is a significant professional statement to the workers themselves and to the local authorities that employ them. The topic of care and assistance to people with intellectual disabilities (ID) and their families is a challenging field that demands professional and human resources. Bringing together representatives of various social sectors in a single mission was a unique learning experience and an opportunity to see projects and professionals in the field from up close. The participation of both the director of the Social Affairs Ministry, the Social Services’ Department of Services for Persons with Developmental Disabilities in the Community, and the director of Social Welfare Services in the Federation of Local Authorities made an important contribution to the mission’s success. The participants got inspiration from their exposure to the downsizing of bureaucracy; from their opportunity to see the variety of solutions in the field, the relatively small frameworks, the aesthetically pleasing buildings and the integration of individuals with IDD in the community; to hear about the shift from institutions to housing in the community, a shift that is also relevant for us; and primarily to understand that, despite the innovativeness and range of services that we saw in the UK, Israel can be proud of the services it provides people with IDD and their families.
“We will be happy,” says Muskal, “to host a study mission from abroad that will come to see the various services we provide and the challenges we face here in Israel. We believe its participants will see that the State of Israel is beautiful and well-developed. They will see in Israel the example of a country that managed, soon after its establishment, to create a network of settings and provide solutions in the community for people with complex disabilities while coping with countless security and social challenges.”

Our expression of thanks and appreciation
“The study tour was planned and organized to the minutest detail,” Muskal says. The success of the study tour was made possible thanks to the efforts of the professional team of the Federation of Local Authorities’ Division for External Relations, headed by Ruth Wasserman-Landa, who, together with Shiri Steinhart-Sel, worked diligently on the complex job of coordinating the program with the Israeli Embassy in the UK.
Special thanks are due Haim Gaash, Chairperson of the Shalem Foundation and Mayor of Pardess Hannah-Karkur, and to the senior management of the Foundation for their dedication to the subject of continual learning and for enabling this study tour to take place.
The Shalem Foundation never rests on its laurels, though, and looks forward to the next study tour.
 
 
 
 
 
At the entrance to the center: Lough road center with special buses purchased by parents
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
A fascinating meeting with the organization "change" and some employees who spread the knowledge of self-advocacy all over the world

 



Shalem Know-How: The first conference dedicated to presenting studies conducted with the assistance of the Shalem Foundation    

 This past June a special day-long conference was held for the first time to present research studies supported by the Shalem Foundation. The one-day conference — the Foundation’s first in the field of research — was held at the Sheatufim Center in Beit Yehoshua. It showcased selected research studies that the Foundation has supported and that were completed in 2015. The conference was attended by dozens of professionals, members of the academic community, researchers, representatives of the Social Affairs and Social Services Ministry, representatives of local social services and education departments.
 
The Shalem Foundation began its support and promotion of academic research in the field of intellectual and development disabilities in 1998.
The Shalem Foundation received 253 applications for research grants between 1998 and 2014. Of these, 65 percent were approved. Of the applications that the Foundation received, 50 percent were requests for research grants, 39 percent were Master’s theses and nine percent were doctoral dissertations. To date, 64 research studies, 17 doctoral dissertations and 75 Master’s theses have been completed with the Foundation’s support. The Foundation invested NIS5.5 million in research grants during this period.
 
Sharon Ganot, Director of Information at the Shalem Foundation, says, “Among the applications submitted to the Foundation for assistance, the main fields of the researchers’ specialization were social work, education, health care professions, social research, psychology and medicine. The primary subjects of the research studies were integration in the community, caregivers, caregiving staff and social attitudes and perceptions.
“According to a study carried out by the Foundation and by researchers, among the research studies and doctoral and Master’s theses submitted to the Foundation over the years, 23 were cited in academic journals and 46 were cited in non-academic publications. As people familiar with the academic research field, these are inspiring figures and a source of pride. The subject of IDD has definitely become more fascinating over the years.”

At the day-long conference, the research studies presented included, inter alia, the following:
• A study by Prof. Shunit Reiter and Dr. Nirit Karni-Weiser of the University of Haifa on reports from people with IDD who live in various types of housing on the phenomenon of verbal violence aimed at them
• A study by Prof. Hephzibah Lifshitz and Hagit Hagoel of Bar-Ilan University on the reasons for the phenomenon of singlehood among IDD adults and adults with or without Down Syndrome
• A study by Dr. Hala Mashriqi, under the direction of Prof. Arie Rimmerman of the University of Haifa, on sexual danger, the capacity for standing trial, and the criminal responsibility of sex offenders with IDD
• A study by Professor Ruth Defrin, Professor Hagai Pik, and Tali Benromano of Tel Aviv University on the perception of pain and reactivity to pain among individuals with IDD and the search for objective indices of pain measurement
• A study by Inbal Devori, under the direction of Professor Einat Peled of Tel Aviv University, on the parental perceptions of the sexuality of men and women with IDD

From theory to action
As of 2012, the Shalem Foundation has begun engaging in applying research by showing studies to professionals and decision-makers, and by discussing recommendations for applying the conclusions of these studies on the ground.

View the presentations and lectures given at the conference.

Read the abstracts of the papers that were presented at the conference. (The collection of abstracts is in Hebrew, Arabic, and English)
 
 

 



A special brainstorming session on feeding people with IDD    

 Feeding people with IDD is one of the most difficult tasks in the role of direct caregivers in frameworks for nursing cases and is also one of the most important interactions between the caregiving staff and the care recipients in such frameworks.
A brainstorming session on feeding people with IDD was held on July 14 at the Beit Doron center in Ramat Gan. This session was part of the process of applying the findings of research studies, with the aim of determining how much it is possible to ease the burden on the caregivers of helpless population groups in general and persons with IDD in particular, specifically in regarding to feeding.
The brainstorming session was led by Malka from the AWARE Institute, which also carried out the research study. Conducted in a round-table format, it dealt with the various aspects of feeding that are discussed in research studies: gentleness, a positive attitude, personal contact, involvement, mealtime as a social and learning event, pleasure, and so on.
Counselors and caregivers from various community settings were seated around each table, as were the directors of those settings and caregivers in the health services field. All the participants focused on ideas and examples for promoting these aspects in the daily routine of caregiving for people with IDD.
The results of the brainstorming session will lead to recommendations to be applied in places where people with IDD are fed, so as to make life easier for both the caregiving teams and the recipients of their services.
 
Sharon Ganot, Director of Information at the Shalem Foundation, said, “The session that we held was a fascinating experience. It enabled us to learn about new insights, opportunities for breakthroughs, and innovations in the field. Food is an essential subject in our culture; the meeting with professionals in the field and with people with IDD over the various issues connected with food showcased the various emotions, needs and desires associated with the topic of food.”
The research and its implementation process are being conducted with the close collaboration of representatives of the Community Services Department of the Division of Services for Persons with Developmental Disabilities at the Social Affairs and Social Services Ministry.
 
The representatives are:
• Shoshi Aspeler, coordinating nurse in the field of community nursing care, Health Services Unit
• Sigal Yisraeli, National Nutrition Supervisor, Health Services Unit
• Nili Ben-Dor, National Information Management and Instruction Supervisor
• Anat Frank, National Supervisor for Advancement Programs, Analysis, Implementation and Advancement Department
 
The Shalem Foundation is a partner in the initiation, operation and funding of both research studies and their implementation.
 

 



Israel’s first training kitchen for children with special needs is established at the Taf Lataf School    

 A state-of-the-art training kitchen, the first of its kind in Israel, has been established at the Taf Lataf School for children with special needs, which is partially funded by the Shalem Foundation.
The purpose of the training kitchen is to enable the pupils to gain experience in working – with guidance and supervision – in a kitchen to prepare them for independent life as adults, provide them with training for future employment and teach them motor, language and learning skills.
The training kitchen at Taf Lataf, which was built specially for children with moderate to profound IDD, is adapted for children with physical disabilities.

The kitchen is fully equipped with work surfaces, gas ranges, electrical appliances and utensils that have been adapted for accessibility and safety. This “smart” kitchen is operated with iPads.
Professional staff are always with the pupils in the kitchen. Under their guidance, the children prepare dishes according to their level of ability and gain experience in peeling pre-cut fruits and vegetables or shredding them for fresh or cooked salads. They also learn how to bake cakes and cookies, prepare desserts and confections, and fry omelettes, to name only a few examples.
In addition to cooking skills, the children also learn the rules of cleanliness and safety and acquire proper work habits. In addition, they develop fundamental ADL (activities of daily living) skills.
The staff at Taf Lataf, which invests a great deal of time and energy in preparing the pupils in various fields, places considerable emphasis on the basic skills needed for proper social and behavioral functioning and on basic ADL skills. The goal is to prepare the children for a life of optimal quality and as full as possible within the community where they will reside as adults.
 
The Shalem Foundation is a partner in the establishment of this training kitchen.
 

 



Anchor for Life — Sea Scouts; A Sailing Competition on the Yarkon River; Community Social Projects    

 Approximately three years ago, the Shalem Foundation set up a special way to provide assistance, among its other activities: by supporting community projects on the periphery and in the regional councils.
The goal of this track is to support social activities that integrate people with developmental intellectual disabilities, who live in their parents’ homes, in community life.
Anchor for Life — Sea Scouts is an educational maritime program that is given by the Beit She’an municipality in cooperation with the Sea Scouts, the maritime branch of the Israel Scouts.
The founder and manager of the program is Mr. Meir Gross.
The goals of the program are to enable the participants to improve their self-image; find strength under pressure; enhance social, interpersonal, and group skills, experience challenging and fun athletic activity, and integrate into the community.
Meetings take place once a week for two hours in the scouting group on Moshavat kinneret. The program has been running for several years in scouting groups all over Israel, mostly in the central region.
The partner organizations in the project are the Israel Scouts, the Shalem Foundation, and the Golani School in Beit She’an.
The program’s target population is 18 participants aged 15 to 21 who live with their parents and attend a day center.
If you have creative ideas that fit the criteria in the attached link, please feel free to contact us.
The video shows the spectacular competition that takes place at the end of each year.
The Etgarim Association participates in the competition — a peak event that is a foundational and empowering moment for the young people, their parents, the volunteers, and the staff.
 

Filming and editing: Shai Shlomi, 2016

 

 



ידיעון ההשתלמויות של קרן שלם לשנה"ל תשע"ז 2016-2017    

 -

 עמיתים יקרים,
אנו גאים להציג בפניכם את ידיעון ההשתלמויות של קרן שלם לשנה"ל תשע"ז 2016-2017,
ומזמינים אתכם לקחת חלק במגוון הקורסים וההשתלמויות המוצעים בו.
ניתן לצפות בידיעון גם באתר קרן שלם, בלשונית " השתלמויות"
נאחל לכולנו שנת לימודים ועבודה פורייה, שנה של העמקת הידע והרחבת האופקים
שנה טובה !
צוות קרן שלם

לפריט המלא
קרא | הורד