The Shalem Foundation was established in 1983 by the Federation of Local Authorities in cooperation with the Ministry of Social Affairs and Social Services. The foundation works to develop comprehensive services and resources for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities throughout the country.

The Vision of the Shalem Foundation
"People with developmental intellectual disabilities have the basic right to live normal lives within their natural surroundings, to realize their hidden potential, and to be socially, culturally, and occupationally integrated into the community as much as possible, according to their abilities, desires, and needs."
The Shalem Foundation has played a key role in impacting the lives of people with disabilities and their families. The foundation’s multifaceted team continuously strives to develop innovative programs to improve the quality of life of people with disabilities and include them in all aspects of society. The Shalem Foundation understands the complex needs of these individuals and those around them. As these needs change throughout the course of their lives, The Shalem Foundation aims to help every step of the way.
The Shalem Foundation Assists in the Following Areas:
• Funding of physical development of community facilities
• Funding and support of innovative social services and programs for people with developmental disabilities 
• Funding and development of advanced educational and tutoring programs for professionals
• Funding and assistance with artistic productions by people with intellectual and developmental disabilities
• Creation and support of activities that promote and change way of thinking and attitudes towards people with intellectual and developmental disabilities
• Funding of research, professional knowledge development and models, training and conferences
The Shalem Foundation provides funding for approximately 200 projects and initiatives throughout Israel each year. The organization works in full cooperation with local councils, representatives of the Ministry of Social Affairs & Social Services and other nonprofit organizations throughout Israel.
The Shalem Foundation encourages new ideas and activities in the field of intellectual and developmental disabilities and offers annual awards to heads of regional councils, public figures and volunteers. The Foundation also awards prizes for excellence to regional councils and individuals with intellectual disabilities who have contributed to society or to unique projects.

The Shalem Foundation has made a number of strategic goals for the years 2015-2020. They include:
1. Changing perceptions and inclusion of people with disabilities in all aspects of daily life. This includes development of a unique enterprise that will offer a glimpse into the world of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The center will be the first of its kind in the world and will enable partnership with people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.
2. Capacity building, training, applied research, knowledge and skill development for professional workers and caretakers of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. 
3. An incubator for change: the Shalem foundation invites all initiatives which promote the inclusion of people with disabilities in society as well as bettering their quality of life.
The Shalem Foundation is dedicated to utilizing the potential of every person with intellectual disabilities in order to provide them with the best possible quality of life as well as educating society as a whole to be more inclusive and caring. 
Parenting Rights for Persons with Mental and Intellectual Disabilities: An Alternative Conception of ‘Parenthood’ as a Mean to Promote Disability Rights   Catalog # 639| Supervised By: Prof. Gideon Sapir  

This work was supported by a grant from Shalem Fund for Development of Services for People with Intellectual Disabilities in the Local Councils in Israel

Parenthood constitutes, usually, a substantial part of an one’s adult life, and therefore the right to found a family is an integral part of the United Nation’s Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Nevertheless, research of the policy and legislation in this field reveals an opposite approach, one that restricts and prevents parenting of persons with disabilities, and especially intellectual and mental disabilities. This research aims to uncover the reasons for this contradiction, reasons that are grounded both in the unique characterizations of parenthood and on the institutional perception of parenthood, which is reflected by the welfare authorities and the courts. The research suggests that adopting an alternative perception of parenthood, one that doesn’t focus only on duty but also on personal development and relationship, holds the potential to bridge the gap between theoretic ideals of parenthood equality, and the realization of parenthood rights in practice. Following the universal approach to disability, the alternative perception would benefit not only parents with disabilities but all parents, since most if not all of them experience temporary or permanent difficulties performing their parenthood duties.

Key search words: parenthood, disability, children’s rights.

For the full text in hebrew




What’s more simple than going to a coffee shop and ordering a cup of coffee and a pastry?    

The target of the project was to develop an initial model of an accessible menu for people with intellectual disabilities (I.e. cognitively accessible menu.)
The model was developed by the Israel Institute for Cognitive Disability with the participation of a group of people with intellectual disabilities.
The process has resulted in the creation of formal document principles for accessing menus for people with intellectual disabilities: for categories, use of simple concepts, use of symbols, use of images, font sizes and colors.
You are invited to watch a video documenting the process and imagine what life would look like for people with disabilities if all the cafes in Israel and around the world had access to their menus.
 
The project was initiated and funded by Shalem foundation, the Fund for Developmental Services Foundation for People with Disabilities and Developmental Disabilities in the Local cuncils in Israel in cooperation with Cofix - Coffee Network in Israel.
 
The project was done by the Israeli Institute for Cognitive Access
Photography and editing: Idan Aslan.
Participants: recipients of service at the Ami Association 
  

 

 

 

 




Intervention of Medical/Therapeutic Clowns in a Kindergarten for Children with Intellectual Disabilities   Catalog #890-68-2018  

This work was supported by a grant from Shalem Fund for Development of Services for People with Intellectual Disabilities in the Local Councils in Israel The study examined and evaluated the contribution of the work of two therapeutic clowns in a cluster of kindergartens for children with developmental disabilities in the framework of free interactive and humorous play (clownish play). The evaluation focused on the playing skills of the children, on their social skills and their emotional involvement. Based on positive results of a pilot study from 2015-16,…

קרא עוד


Linguistic Accessibility for People with Intellectual Disabilities: Influence of the Referring Expression on Text Comprehension   Catalog # 650| Supervised By: Prof. Orna Peleg, Dr. Sigal Uziel-karl  

This work was supported by a grant from Shalem Fund for Development of Services for People with Intellectual Disabilities in the Local Councils in Israel

 
The widely used guidelines for language simplification have been tested empirically only to a limited extent. We examined one language simplification guideline: The preference of full lexical noun phrases over pronouns. This instruction is inconsistent with studies suggesting that in the case of typically developed readers, referencing to a prominent entity by name repetition is actually more difficult to process than pronoun referencing (the “repeated name penalty”) (Gordon, Grosz, & Gilliom, 1993). However, given that other studies demonstrate the impact of memory impairment on anaphoric processes (Almor, 2000), we hypothesized that people with intellectual disability, who suffer from memory deficiency, will prefer name repetition referencing. The findings are incongruent with our hypothesis and the guideline examined: There was no evidence that name repetition was more efficient than pronouns in helping people with intellectual disability understand the texts. This stresses the importance of empirical examination of the language simplification guidelines.
 
Keywords: Language accessibility, language simplification, intellectual disability, repeated name penalty, anaphoric processes, full noun phrase, pronoun
 
For the Full text in Hebrew




Findings report of Mapping the Social Services for people with Intellectual developmental disabilities in the local authorities which received support from the Shalem Fund at the last three decades (with an emphasis on rehabilitation daycare, employment frames work and social clubs)   Catalog # 259| PhD. Adi Levi Vered, Noga chen  

This study was carried out by 'Michlol'- the Assessment and Measurement Unit of the Shalem Foundation

 
For more than three decades, the Shalem Fund has been supporting the development of services for people with Intellectual developmental disabilities in the local authorities through professional advice and financial support
Establishment of the Disabilities Administration in the Ministry of Social Welfare and Social Services development of the service sequence (partly multi-handicapped), development programs in the authorities (roof agreements and urban renewal programs) - all these and more have an impact on the scope of needs and the answers for those needs in each authority
With the help of 'Michlol', an intra-organizational assessment unit of the Shalem fund, the foundation has been collecting, analyzing and mapping data, based on frameworks for people with Intellectual developmental disabilities in local authorities all over the country - frameworks that have received support from Shalem fund over the past three decades


The data analysis indicates needs and aims in the area of service development

The relationship between the size of the authority (current and in the future) and the scope of existing services indicates needs that will be needed to address to people with disabilities in general and to people with Intellectual developmental disabilities in particular

In an authority that has about 100,000 residents or more, it is necessary to develop more than one framework for a particular service Needs identified in rehabilitation day care centers and day care centers for the therapeutic, nursing and aging population Regional councils will required breakthrough thinking to develop responses for needs, especially leisure activities

To sum up, we can say that tomorrow is already here! The fund's accumulated experience shows that starting and running of service or project development - if will start today - will come to it end in about four to five years
Shalem fund will continue to provide professional assistance in the drive for quality of life for people with Intellectual developmental disabilities and other disabilities, and invite the authorities to contact them and get support in advancing service development


To read the full findings report in Hebrew press here
To view the summarizing presentation of results in Hebrew press here
To view the extended presentation in Hebrew press here

Key Words
People with Intellectual developmental disabilities
Research, assessment and measurement
Shalem Fund study

 




Survey findings: Accessibility Services Needs for People with Intellectual developmental disabilities in the Community and Local Authorities   Catalog # 256| PhD. Adi Levi Vered, Noga chen  

This study was carried out by 'Michlol'- the Assessment and Measurement Unit of the Shalem Foundation


Assessing the issue of information accessibility for people with Intellectual developmental disabilities developed out of the need of the largest authorities forum in Israel, to understand the needs of people with disabilities, and to develop cognitive accessibility eamsures for people with disabilities across the country, in line with the "Equal Rights for People with Disabilities Act" and the "Accessibility Regulations" Law. As part of this assessment, a survey was conducted for the role holders in the local authorities, in collaboration with various representatives of the local authorities in the social services departments, cognitive disability institutes, and representatives of the local government. This is for the purpose to examine what is currently being done in this area in the local authorities and the community, in the eyes of service providers in the authorities

To read the full findings report in Hebrew press here
To view the summarizing presentation of results in Hebrew
press here
To view the Executive Summary in Hebrew
press here

Key Words
People with Intellectual developmental disabilities
Cognitive accessibility
Shalem Fund study

 

 




Evaluating the contribution of the "Lilach" website - accessing information in the field of women's health   Catalog # 219| PhD. Adi Levi Vered, Noga Chen  

This study was carried out by 'Michlol'- the Assessment and Measurement Unit of the Shalem Fund

 Every year, Shalem Fund offers student ideas that may develop and contribute to a population with developmental intellectual disabilities. Accordingly, Noa Maynart and Shahar Moore, BA Students at the Holon Institute of Technology have developed an online platform for accessing information on women's health, for women with intellectual disabilities. The rationale for the project stemmed from the need to step up from the field, whereby gynecological examinations are performed on women with developmental intellectual disabilities without the woman being a significant part of the examination, meaning they do not know what is expected of them and at the time of examination they do not know exactly what the doctor is examining and why. This project was assessed by Michlol - evaluation and research unit of the Shalem Fund. The evaluation study included 23 women with developmental intellectual disabilities from 7 different housing frames, as well as 14 direct caregivers who accompanied them to the process. The purposes of the research were focused on examining women's knowledge after exposure to the 'Lilach' site, examining their change in attitude at the visit to the women doctor following the exposure of the site as well as the satisfaction of the women and caregivers from the site. in general, the results of the evaluation were positive and sometimes surprising in terms of the women's own responses to the various questions referred to them. The site seemed to provide learning and emotional preparation to the woman for visiting at the women's doctor. Moreover, the acquisition of knowledge contributed significantly to have a more positive visit to the women's doctor, among women with developmental disabilities

 

To read the full findings report in Hebrew press here
To view the summarizing presentation of results in Hebrew
press here
To read the executive summary in Hebrew 
press here

Key Words : 
People with Intellectual developmental disabilities
Cognitive accessibility
Shalem Fund study

 




Using a computer application to demonstrate and learn through video scenarios to improve the social skills needed to work among people with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities   Catalog # 181 | aditional authors : Dr. Sharon Zlotnik, Mrs. Yfat Ben Refael, Dr. Eynat Gal  

This work was supported by a grant from Shalem Fund for Development of Services for People with Intellectual Disabilities in the Local Councils in Israel
 
People with mild to moderate Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities often find it difficult to integrate into the workplace. This project included the development of demonstration and learning videos, examining their usability and their use for intervention to promote the social skills required in the work world. The study examined people with mild to moderate Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities who exhibited difficulty in adaptive behavior. The outcome measures included behavioral questionnaires and observations of performance and were sampled at four time points: one month before the intervention, immediately prior to the intervention, after the intervention and one month after the intervention. There was a significant improvement in adaptive behavior immediately after, and one month after the completion of the intervention. Improvement in behaviors not addressed during the intervention were found as well. These results provide preliminary evidence of the usability and effectiveness of video modelling during an intervention that combines learning by demonstration along with a social problem-solving approach for this population.
 
Key words: Intellectual and Developmental disabilities, video self-modeling, video modeling, social problem-solving approach
 
 
For the Full text in Hebrew
 




Survey findings: The perception of local authorities' officials on research in the field of intellectual developmental disabilities   Catalog # 257| PhD. Adi Levi Vered, Noga chen  

This study was carried out by 'Michlol'- the Assessment and Measurement Unit of the Shalem Foundation


This survey was created by a large-scale qualitative study initiated by the Shalem Foundation (
see link) which dealt with the extent of the contribution, impact and / or effectiveness of the fund's long-term investment in research, as well as the contribution of the studies it supported in the area of intellectual disability. In the framework of the research, the studies presented to the Shalem Foundation research committee were mapped over the years, in various aspects such as: content and topics, budget, researchers, the number of references to the research and its support and more. Additionally, depth interviews were conducted with experts and stakeholders to obtain a picture of their perceptions of the contribution of these studies as well as of the perception on the idea of support in research as one of the Foundation's functions
Following the findings of the study, it was decided to conduct a survey among the professionals at the social services departments in all the local authorities in order to learn about the needs for applied research that could serve them optimally and improve the quality of service provided to people with intellectual disabilities and those around them


This document presents the findings of the survey conducted in the first quarter of 2019

To read the full findings report in Hebrew press here
To view the summarizing presentation of results in Hebrew
press here
To view the Executive Summary in Hebrew
press here

Key Words
People with Intellectual developmental disabilities
Research, assessment and measurement
Shalem Fund study

 




The Contribution of the Endogenous and Exogenous Factors to the Three Components of Working Memory among Adolescents and Adults with Intellectual Disability: The Impaired, Stable and the Compensatory Trajectories   Catalog # 631| Supervised By: Prof. Hefziba Lifshitz  

This work was supported by a grant from Shalem Fund for Development of Services for People with Intellectual Disabilities in the Local Councils in Israel
 
The aim of these study is examine developmental trajectories of working memory among individuals with intellectual disabilities (IQ = 40-70, N = 123) (hereinafter ID) NSID (non-specific intellectual disability), and Down Syndrome (DS) from adolescence (ages 16-21) to later adulthood (41-55).We used nine test (Cornoldi & Vecchi, 2003) for testing the three components of working memory (Baddeley, 2007).
From adolescence (16-21) to young adulthood (25-40): In the phonological loop and central executive in phonological modality there was an increase in working memory. In the visuospatial sketchpad and central executive in spatial modality tasks, a non-significant moderate decline was found. From young adulthood (25-40) to later adulthood (41-55): in the verbal working memory was found a decline. In the visuospatial working memory a non significant moderate decline was found. The second part of the study examined the effect of participation in leisure activity on the development of working memory among individuals with ID age 20 and older. Use was made of the Participation in leisure time activities questionnaire (Wilson & Benet, 2005). The level of participation in leisure time activities contributed significantly to scores in two verbal working memory tests and one visuospatial working memory test.
Keywords: Working memory, intellectual disability, Down syndrome, phonological loop, visual-spatial sketchpad, central executive, adolescence, adults, trajectories

For the Full text in Hebrew 




Adaptation and resilience in families of individuals with Down syndrome   Catalog # 177  

This work was supported by a grant from Shalem Fund for Development of Services for People with Intellectual Disabilities in the Local Councils in Israel

 
The study was cross-sectional, data were collected from a convenience sample of 95 (74 mothers and 21 fathers) parents of children with Down Syndrome, using a self-administered questionnaire designed to assess parent strengths and coping. The questionnaire included 187 items. The results showed that overtime parents adapt to the child's situation. Support is associated with better family outcomes,family stressors associated with less effective coping. Support and guidance from a therapist can help parents cope. Organizing meetings of parents of children with Down Syndrome will enable sharing their challenges and experiences of everyday life, which can help build relience and reduce stress.
 
Keywords: Down Syndrome, parents, coping, well-being, reslience
 
For the Full text in Hebrew




Supported employment - as part of the Employment Services for People with Intellectual developmental disability- mapping the characteristics of the partners in the program and the satisfaction of the employe   Catalog # 165 | PhD. Adi Levi Vered, Maya Sabag, Bosmat Hoh, Noga chen  

This study was carried out by 'Michlol'- the Assessment and Measurement Unit of the Shalem Foundation


The following evaluation report present the mapping of the characteristics of employed persons, employers, workplaces and coordinators accompanying the employment program. Additionally, the report presents the findings of the employer's satisfaction assessment of the program and the findings of the training and professional development needs of the coordinators in this program. All these in order to show the characteristics of the populations involved in the program and the examination of points in the plan that must be invested in their cultivation, alongside elements that must be preserved, as of 2015 to 2017

To read the full findings report in Hebrew press here
To view the summarizing presentation of results in Hebrew press here
To view the Executive Summary in Hebrew press here

Key Words
People with intellectual developmental disabilities
Employment
Caregivers and staff
Research, assessment and measurement
Shalem Fund study